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Living and working in the bay area I have great access to up and coming technologies. In almost any friendly lunch meeting I’m likely to be asked “Who is hot?” Momentum trading is the cultural norm for mid-career professionals in the zip codes I frequent. Good answers to this question are further complicated by the increasing hyper-competitiveness in the software world, where we often see multiple open source and ‘free’ offerings targeting the same space.  Answering ‘what’s hot’ in this context also requires factoring in business model execution–a daunting real time calculation over a salad. 

While I trust this ‘hot’ grapevine, I suspect it has a high correlation to VC funding activities and as such is hierarchical diffusion and not the contagious diffusion it might appear to be. Its also the opposite empirical approach to this awesome talk by John Rauser. After watching his talk I wanted to look at individual data records more than ever–individual tweets, github gists, and job listings have become a few of my favorites. 

To start the New Year though I thought I’d capture some of the current state high level jobs data around many of the technologies and brands I follow, it could be interesting to do this every year as a level set to start the march. All of the data is from the familiar Indeed data, most famous for their trend graphs, but for now I am more interested in absolute numbers. 

First, job listings by brands:

 

Microsoft

229,601

Oracle 

63,877

IBM

43,472

SAP

34,528

cisco 

20,181

VMware

15,824

google

12,228

SAS

10,535

Salesforce.com

9,212

Citrix

6,588

RedHat

6,444

Juniper

3,826

AWS/EC2

3,568

Teradata

2,934

Tibco

1,877

Github

1,340

 

Microsoft’s scale in job listings vs. other tech brands is impressive, nearly 3 standard deviations out in this sample. This isn’t a listing of ‘existing’ jobs, but active postings out there in North America today. No doubt lots of this is client side users of their productivity tools, but they have strong showings across the board. SharePoint alone has nearly 21k jobs listed! IBM’s showing is surprisingly poor compared to Oracle’s, and perhaps this demonstrates the depths to which IBM has shifted from a product company to a services company with fewer point technologies.

Amazon’s strong showing with EC2 is worth noting and watching for the numbers next year. This number is helped by the hundreds of jobs posted by Amazon itself for its fast growing AWS group. 

Next up, platforms frameworks and languages: 

 

Java

66,151

.NET

62,183

javascript

40,906

C++

32,166

Perl

21,014

jquery

17,520

PHP

17,422

Python 

17,269

Android

10,640

Ruby Frameworks

10,402

iOS

10,321

html5

8,769

Cobol 

2,246

Node.js

1,319

 

Almost any data point you find shows Java slightly ahead of .NET in enterprise usage and this sample is no different. iOS is still a small fraction of Java, as many companies have a mobile problem, but perhaps not a solution yet. 

Much of that code is now living in Git, as a serious number of job listings now require it as a skill:

 

Git

5,165

Subversion/SVN

9,114

 

On the data side: 

 

mysql

16,655

MSSQL

11,634

DB2

7,144

Hadoop

5,033

Oracle DBA or 11g

4,875

Postgres

3,447

MongoDB

2,389

Cassandra 

1,557

HBase 

1,366

Redis

1,018

Memcached

814

Riak 

252

 

Cassandra is the unexpected data point in this set for me. Mongo’s ease of use made it a fast grower, but Apache Cassandra is fast gaining ground without any significant corporate marketing behind it. Is this a demonstration of the power of the Netflix cloud architecture story?

Netflix also uses Tomcat, so let’s take a peek at the Java middleware names: 

 

Websphere 

8,517

Tomcat

7,316

Weblogic

6,207

jboss

5,866

Glassfish

453

 

Digging into the numbers more than 5k of the Websphere listings had no mention of any other middleware alternative. The Apache Tomcat numbers are very strong, surpassing other open source alternatives by a comfortable margin.

 The world of operating systems is almost forgotten in polite tech lunch conversations these days, but its still worth taking the temperature on the skills economy around them:

 

Linux 

48,725

UNIX

39,898

Windows Server

37,532

Solaris 

7,322

RHEL/Red Hat

7,274

AIX

4,127

Centos

1,613

Ubuntu 

1,268

HP-UX

959

SuSe

893

 

I am shocked, shocked by the win of Solaris over RHEL (only 1.5k RHEL explict listings actually) and AIX. The complete death of HP’s UNIX group is also evident. Centos has more listings than RHEL, and a sizeable fraction of the overall generic Red Hat listings. Clearly people are looking to hire talent that is comfortable working with Centos and around Red Hat’s faux free grip. 

The cloud and devops tools have gotten a ton of chatter lately:

 

tivoli

1,796

puppet

1,788

Chef 

1,194

Rightscale

975

openstack

643

Cloudstack

200

Opscode 

78

enStratus

6

 

The grapevine has been telling me of the rise of enterprise Puppet jobs, and the data seems to indicate this. Trying to find a search for Chef that eliminated the food service industry was non trivial, so take their number with some caution as I had to insert a few filter words (as many of these data points have btw). Rightscale’s showing here, given their 100% proprietary model is notable. I’ve included the Opscode listings for comparison to their pure open source brand. 

Finally, in the war of the hype words, which ones will get you an interview? 

 

Cloud 

28,122

Big Data

5,651

NoSQL

3,894

PaaS

1,099

devops

976

 

You guessed it: the Cloud word. It is now nearly as ubiquitous in job listings as in industry conference names. I take job listings much more seriously however, as they inherently are putting money where their buzz-word is. I expected more devops listings than PaaS but that did not turn out to be the case. I expect to spend the rest of my day reading all of the PaaS listings on a detailed level. 

I’ll run this same data and hopefully add a few more hot topics next year on New Year ’s Day. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thought on “2013 Technologies: Ranked by Job openings

  1. Hi James,Great post on the tech job market. I see that cloud and big data are most likely to be featured in an interview. I’m glad I came across this. Thanks for sharing! At the moment, I’m looking for bloggers and contributors for a storage, cloud computing and big data website. Would you perhaps be interested in contributing your past and future blog articles? We want this website to be a thriving community of experts generating conversations on big data, cloud computing and storage virtualization. It’s free to join, and only the title and the first few sentences of your blog entries will be published on the website. We want readers to engage with your content and be directed to your blog for the full article. This way, you’ll get traffic! :)If you’re interested or have any questions, please send me an email at tinajin [at] atomicreach.com with “Tech” in the subject line. I’ll be glad to answer any questions and get you started on being an expert contributor!Sincerely,Tina Jin

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